Goto main content

Lunch & Learn

HI invites you to a Lunch & Learn on 24 April on the subject of: Does innovation make the humanitarian sector more efficient?
Invitation for the Lunch & Learn on innovation in the humanitarian sector

More than 30 million people in low-income countries need an artificial limb or an orthopedic device, but according to the World Health Organization, only 5% to 15% of them have access to these services. The development of new technologies, such as 3D printing and telemedicine, has paved the way for innovative approaches to delivering health services, including reaching patients living in remote areas or in conflict zones.
 
With the support of the Belgian Department for Development Cooperation and Humanitarian Assistance (DGD), HI and its partners have implemented a project on 3D printing of orthopedic devices and telemedicine. What are the results of this project? Does innovation make the humanitarian sector more efficient?

>> If you want to participate, please click here to register

 

Practical information

When: 24th April - 12.30-14.00 PM

Address: Rue de l'Arbre Bénit 44 - 1050 Brussels - Ubuntu meeting room
You can easily access this site by public transport. Click here for more information.                     
 

Pour aller plus loin

© HI
Réadaptation Urgence

Amputé à cause de son diabète : le parcours d'Abdelrazzaq
© HI
Réadaptation Santé

Amputé à cause de son diabète : le parcours d'Abdelrazzaq

Le diabète est l'une des causes importante de handicap et peut même mener à l'amputation. C'est ce qui est arrivé à Abdelrazzaq, atteint de cette maladie

Channa, un pas vers l'avenir
© Lucas Veuve/HI
Réadaptation

Channa, un pas vers l'avenir

Channa est née avec une malformation. Son histoire montre l'importance d'un traitement de réadaptation et du suivi à long terme pour les enfants en situation de handicap.